Celebs Born In Different Countries Quiz

It’s time to guess where everyone’s favourite talents were born (spoiler: it’s not always where you think!) So we’re gonna test your celeb knowledge, let’s get into it:

What other celebs were born in a surprising place? Let us know in the comments!

|0|https://www.buzzfeed.com/tori_honore/celebs-born-in-other-countries-quiz|1|https://img.buzzfeed.com/buzzfeed-static/static/2023-01/27/17/enhanced/b90adebb87ba/original-8801-1674842003-8.jpg?crop=1581:830;0,0%26downsize=1250:*|2|www.buzzfeed.com|E|

56-foot endangered whale found dead on Hawaii beach

A 56-foot-long sperm whale washed up dead on a Hawaii beach over the weekend, marking a loss for an endangered species that was nearly wiped out before commercial whaling was put to an end in 1986. 

The carcass, which is an estimated 122,000 pounds, was first spotted on Friday floating on the reef off Lydgate Beach on Kauai’s east shore. High tide ushered it onto the beach on Saturday, according to the Hawaii Department of Land and Natural Resources. The beach was closed through Monday, 

Native Hawaiian practitioners viewed the day’s activities and conducted cultural protocols throughout the day for the dead sperm whale at Lydgate Park on Kauaʻi HI on Jan. 28, 2023

Native Hawaiian practitioners viewed the day’s activities and conducted cultural protocols throughout the day for the dead sperm whale at Lydgate Park on Kauaʻi HI on Jan. 28, 2023

Courtesy of Hawaiʻi Department of Land and Resources

Researchers from the University of Hawaii Health and Stranding Lab are examining the animal to determine the cause of death, and it will take months before lab tests are complete and results are finalized. Jamie Thomton, the Kauai Stranding Coordinator with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Fisheries division, said that the whale likely died only days before washing ashore. 

“There are many possible causes including disease, injuries from a vessel strike, entanglement with discarded fishing line, or ingestion of plastic marine debris,” Dr. Kristi West, who leads the lab, said in a DLNR news release. 

Over the weekend, multiple local agencies used large machinery to lift the whale from the wet sand to a dry area so researchers could conduct a necropsy, a postmortem examination that includes taking samples and measurements. Historians then identified an area where the whale remains can be buried without disturbing ancestral bones, the DLNR said.

Native Hawaiian practitioners viewed the day’s activities and conducted cultural protocols throughout the day for the dead sperm whale at Lydgate Park on Kauaʻi HI on Jan. 28, 2023

Native Hawaiian practitioners viewed the day’s activities and conducted cultural protocols throughout the day for the dead sperm whale at Lydgate Park on Kauaʻi HI on Jan. 28, 2023


Courtesy of Hawaiʻi Department of Land and Resources

A dead 56-foot-long, 120,000-pound sperm whale washed up on the beach at Lydgate Park on Kauaʻi HI on Jan. 28, 2023

A dead 56-foot-long, 120,000-pound sperm whale washed up on the beach at Lydgate Park on Kauaʻi HI on Jan. 28, 2023


Courtesy of Hawaiʻi Department of Land and Resources

A dead 56-foot-long, 120,000-pound sperm whale washed up on the beach at Lydgate Park on Kauaʻi HI on Jan. 28, 2023

A dead 56-foot-long, 120,000-pound sperm whale washed up on the beach at Lydgate Park on Kauaʻi HI on Jan. 28, 2023


Courtesy of Hawaiʻi Department of Land and Resources

Excavators gets ready to remove the dead 56-foot-long, 120,000-pound sperm whale from the beach at Lydgate Park on Kauaʻi HI on Jan. 28, 20023

Excavators gets ready to remove the dead 56-foot-long, 120,000-pound sperm whale from the beach at Lydgate Park on Kauaʻi HI on Jan. 28, 20023


Courtesy of Hawaiʻi Department of Land and Resources


(Courtesy Of Hawaiʻi Department Of Land And Resources)

Known for their large heads and mouths full of teeth, Sperm whales inhabit the deep waters of all the world’s oceans. Their populations plummeted from the 1800s to 1987 as the whaling industry hunted the species for oil that was used in oil lamps, candles and lubricants, according to NOAA. The agency said the species is still recovering. 



|0|https://www.sfgate.com/hawaii/article/endangered-whale-dead-on-hawaii-beach-17753811.php|1|https://s.hdnux.com/photos/01/31/26/05/23421264/5/rawImage.jpg|2|www.sfgate.com|E|

Texas winter weather forces airlines to cancel flights

Delayed flights prepare to depart from Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport (DFW) on January 11, 2023 in Dallas, Texas.

John Moore | Getty Images

More than 1,000 U.S. flights were canceled Tuesday as winter weather hit Texas.

Over 700 flights to and from American Airlines‘ hub Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport were canceled, about 40% of the airport’s schedule, according to FlightAware. Nearly 200 flights at Dallas Love Field, where Southwest Airlines is based, were canceled.

The Federal Aviation Administration slowed arrivals into both airports. Airlines lifted fees or fare differences for travelers affected by the weather if they can fly in early February instead.

Austin-Bergstrom International warned travelers about dangerous road conditions and closures heading to the airport.

Airlines canceled 1,129 U.S. flights on Monday, about 4.6%, the biggest share since yearend holiday disruptions, according to FlightAware data.

|0|https://www.cnbc.com/2023/01/31/texas-winter-weather-airlines-cancel-flights.html|1|https://image.cnbcfm.com/api/v1/image/107177367-1673463364674-gettyimages-1455793805-0g6a0409_95b206de-e48f-4621-821e-269d72359f1b.jpeg?v=1675181220&w=1920&h=1080|2|www.cnbc.com|E|

20 Useful And Money-Saving Travel Tips That Will Motivate You To Book Your Next Trip ASAP

“I saved myself multiple hours in the airport this way — by figuring out my flight will be delayed *before* the airline sends a notification.”


View Entire Post ›

|0|https://www.buzzfeed.com/fabianabuontempo/money-saving-travel-tips|1|[og_img]|2|www.buzzfeed.com|E|

Türkiye raises bets as foreign arrivals near record, tourism revenues boom

Türkiye raised its tourism estimates on Tuesday, encouraged by fresh data that indicated a complete rebound from a pandemic fallout, as foreign arrivals in 2022 neared a record and revenues hit an all-time high.

Foreign visitors arriving in Türkiye surged 80.33% year-over-year to 44.6 million in 2022, just shy of the peak of 45.1 million in 2019, the Culture and Tourism Ministry said. The arrivals saw a rise compared to the 24.71 million foreign visitors in 2021 and 12.73 million in 2020.

Separate data showed tourism revenues jumped 53.4% year-over-year to a record $46.3 billion last year, blowing past the previous high of $38.4 billion in 2019 before the pandemic hit. The figure stood at $30.2 billion in 2021 after the outbreak more than halved it to just $14.8 billion in 2020.

Culture and Tourism Minister Mehmet Nuri Ersoy said foreign arrivals are expected to reach 60 million in 2023, before hitting 90 million in 2028. For the income, Ersoy said they see it rising to $56 billion this year and $100 billion five years from now.

COVID-19 restrictions all but dissipated in 2022 and Russians came in droves partly due to flight restrictions imposed by Western nations over Moscow’s invasion of Ukraine. Hundreds of thousands of Russians are also estimated to have moved last year to Türkiye, seen as a safe haven for investment in homes and other assets.

Arrivals were also backed by a surging demand from European countries, spearheaded by Germany and the United Kingdom.

At 5.7 million, Germans topped the list among nations in 2022 and made up some 12.7% of all visitors, the Culture and Tourism Ministry data showed. They were followed by Russians at 5.2 million, Britons at 3.3 million, Bulgarians at 2.9 million and Iranians at 2.3 million.

The number of foreign tourists arriving in Türkiye in December alone rose 27% from the same period in 2021 to 2.4 million, the Culture and Tourism Ministry data showed. The tourism revenue climbed 22.2% year-over-year to $11.37 billion in the fourth quarter, the Turkish Statistical Institute (TurkStat) said.

Record in spending

The foreign exchange it brings in makes tourism income vital to Türkiye’s economy, as the government’s new economic program focuses on flipping the current account deficits to a surplus, prioritizing exports, production and investments while curbing rising inflation.

A depreciation in the Turkish lira was one of the main drivers for European and Arab tourists last year, sector officials said. The lira weakened some 44% against the U.S. dollar in 2021 and nearly 30% in 2022 but remained stable in the last quarter.

Unveiling five-year targets at an event in Istanbul on Tuesday, Ersoy touted Türkiye’s success given that it managed to go through the coronavirus pandemic with less damage than other countries around the world.

Ersoy’s presentation suggested that foreign arrivals in Türkiye fell 69% after 2019 due to the outbreak that halted global travel and confined people to their homes, versus a 72% drop in the world. He said the world had reached 65% of pre-pandemic levels, whereas Türkiye rebounded to numbers seen before the outbreak.

Istanbul, Türkiye’s most famous city and its largest by population, remained the top draw for foreign visitors, welcoming more than 16 million tourists in 2022. It was followed by the Mediterranean resort city Antalya with 12.8 million visitors. Edirne, a city in northwestern Türkiye bordering Bulgaria and Greece, sat third with 4.6 million tourists.

The average expenditure per night for overnight visitors reached $87.50 in 2022, a record that Ersoy said is expected to jump to $95 this year and $118 in 2028.

The average expenditure per capita came in at $901 in 2022, the TurkStat data showed.

The number of Turkish citizens traveling abroad soared 165.4% to 7.3 million, with their average expenditure reaching $589 per capita, the data showed.

‘Immunity’ to crises

Ersoy also stressed that the government would be expanding its work regarding market diversification and promotional activities, instead of only focusing on nearby regions.

“Every destination that Turkish Airlines flies to is our target market. We have formed new focus markets within the scope of product diversification. We will see very serious increases in these markets,” he noted.

He particularly noted the United States. “We exceeded the number of 1 million visitors from the U.S. last year. Our goal is to host 1.7 or 1.8 million visitors in 2023,” he noted.

“We will also focus on the countries of South America, Scandinavia, the Gulf and the Far East. Another advantage of these countries is that they come from a remote destination, so they leave more money given the income per person since their average stay is longer.”

The main focus of the tourism strategies is finding a way to make Türkiye immune to crises, Ersoy said.

“Our market diversification studies are important in this regard. Türkiye is no longer a country that depends on a single market,” he said, stressing the ability to close any gap “with the share in the cake received from different countries.”

“Turkish tourism has now become immune to crises. For instance, there was a negative reflection caused by the exchange rate differences in the dollar parity. Still, despite this, we were not very impacted due to the market and product diversity,” the minister added.

“As is known, we are living with global cost inflation. We should no longer work by being cost-oriented but income-oriented. We have also achieved a very serious increase in our revenues.”

The Daily Sabah Newsletter

Keep up to date with what’s happening in Turkey,
it’s region and the world.


You can unsubscribe at any time. By signing up you are agreeing to our Terms of Use and Privacy Policy.
This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply.

|0|https://www.dailysabah.com/business/tourism/turkiye-raises-bets-as-foreign-arrivals-near-record-tourism-revenues-boom|1|https://idsb.tmgrup.com.tr/ly/uploads/images/2023/01/31/thumbs/800×531/254681.jpg|2|www.dailysabah.com|E|

The astonishing winning shots in the 2022 Travel Photographer of the Year awards

Take an eye-opening world tour, courtesy of incredible images by some of the best photographers around. 

Their astounding work, said to ‘present a diverse and glorious view of life on our planet’, has deservedly been honoured in the 2022 global Travel Photographer of the Year (TPOTY) contest.

This year, almost 20,000 images were submitted by amateur and professional photographers from 154 countries. Among the prize winners, there’s a heartwarming picture of a pair of polar bears embracing in Norway’s Svalbard archipelago, a transfixing image of a cloud passing over ‘snow monsters’ – snow-covered trees – in Japan, and a shot of a cluster of penguin chicks hiding from predators in Antarctica.

However, it’s the work of Slovenian photographer Matjaz Krivic that has truly captivated the judges, earning him the title of Travel Photographer of the Year. His winning portfolio comprises poignant photographs of the two last remaining northern white rhinos in the world, as well as extraordinary pictures of a volcanic eruption in the Canary Islands.

TPOTY founder Chris Coe said: ‘Our latest winners form a fascinating collection of images. From the intensely powerful to the exquisitely subtle, sensitive and beautiful, they reach every corner of the world and cover every facet of travelling with a camera. Conservation and sustainability permeate the collection and illustrate the role that photography can play in creating awareness of the issues facing our planet.’ 

The winning shots can all be viewed in the online winners’ gallery at tpoty.com. And the photos will go on display outside in Arnos Vale, Bristol, between the Royal Photographic Society and the Martin Parr Foundation between May 1 and May 31. Scroll down to see MailOnline Travel’s pick of the winners – with work by gold medal winner Krivic at the very bottom…

The overall winner of the 'People's Choice' award and highly commended in the Water category, this fascinating picture by French photographer Romain Miot of a salt caravan – a herd of camels ferrying salt across the desert - was captured in the Sahara Desert in Mauritania. Miot says: ‘No roads lead to this place, so we navigated by compass. Hundreds of dromedaries [a type of camel] and their masters were present on this desert plain where nothing lives. Two wells had been dug to water the camels before the caravan left for Mali, Cote d'Ivoire and Burkina Faso to sell the salt.’ Reflecting on how the photo turned out, he says: ‘When I returned from the trip, I realised that this image of a camel owner ordering the dromedaries looked like a conductor with an orchestra’

The overall winner of the ‘People’s Choice’ award and highly commended in the Water category, this fascinating picture by French photographer Romain Miot of a salt caravan – a herd of camels ferrying salt across the desert – was captured in the Sahara Desert in Mauritania. Miot says: ‘No roads lead to this place, so we navigated by compass. Hundreds of dromedaries [a type of camel] and their masters were present on this desert plain where nothing lives. Two wells had been dug to water the camels before the caravan left for Mali, Cote d’Ivoire and Burkina Faso to sell the salt.’ Reflecting on how the photo turned out, he says: ‘When I returned from the trip, I realised that this image of a camel owner ordering the dromedaries looked like a conductor with an orchestra’

A special mention in the ‘Deserts to Rainforests’ category goes to this stunning photograph of Mount Zao, which lies between the Yamagata and Miyagi prefectures in Japan. Describing the photograph, native photographer Kazuaki Koseki says: ‘A rare lenticular cloud – said to be the sign of bad weather – looms over the “snow monsters”, the snow-covered trees, on Mount Zao as night approaches’

A special mention in the ‘Deserts to Rainforests’ category goes to this stunning photograph of Mount Zao, which lies between the Yamagata and Miyagi prefectures in Japan. Describing the photograph, native photographer Kazuaki Koseki says: ‘A rare lenticular cloud – said to be the sign of bad weather – looms over the “snow monsters”, the snow-covered trees, on Mount Zao as night approaches’

British photographer John Seager turned his camera on the Cone of Arita, a peak formed by salt and black lava in Argentina’s Salar de Arizaro salt flats, for this mesmerising photograph. He describes the Cone of Arita as a ‘spectacular' geological formation that ‘seems to be lost’ in the ‘vast desert’ of the salt flats. He adds: ‘Using a drone, I was able to capture the magnificent shadow of Arita on this beautiful, cloudless evening.’ The shot earns the gold medal in the single image section of the ‘Deserts to Rainforests’ category

British photographer John Seager turned his camera on the Cone of Arita, a peak formed by salt and black lava in Argentina’s Salar de Arizaro salt flats, for this mesmerising photograph. He describes the Cone of Arita as a ‘spectacular’ geological formation that ‘seems to be lost’ in the ‘vast desert’ of the salt flats. He adds: ‘Using a drone, I was able to capture the magnificent shadow of Arita on this beautiful, cloudless evening.’ The shot earns the gold medal in the single image section of the ‘Deserts to Rainforests’ category 

A snowy owl flies through falling snow in Connecticut in this spellbinding shot by Yaron Schmid, who says: ‘After watching her for a few hours from a safe distance, she finally flew into the snowstorm.' The U.S photographer describes the picture – the recipient of a special mention in the Blue Planet, Green Planet category - as his ‘dream shot’

A snowy owl flies through falling snow in Connecticut in this spellbinding shot by Yaron Schmid, who says: ‘After watching her for a few hours from a safe distance, she finally flew into the snowstorm.’ The U.S photographer describes the picture – the recipient of a special mention in the Blue Planet, Green Planet category – as his ‘dream shot’

Earning a special mention in the Blue Planet, Green Planet category, this photograph shows Adelie penguin chicks finding refuge in an intricate tunnel system formed in icebergs in Antarctica. Australian photographer Scott Portelli explains: ‘Using these passageways to avoid predators, they group together for safety. Leopard seals patrol the surrounding waters, while skuas [predatory seabirds] survey the vulnerable chicks from above’

Earning a special mention in the Blue Planet, Green Planet category, this photograph shows Adelie penguin chicks finding refuge in an intricate tunnel system formed in icebergs in Antarctica. Australian photographer Scott Portelli explains: ‘Using these passageways to avoid predators, they group together for safety. Leopard seals patrol the surrounding waters, while skuas [predatory seabirds] survey the vulnerable chicks from above’

This beautiful photograph by Katy Gomez depicts a child of the Baka community in a jungle in southeast Cameroon. Describing this shot, which receives a special mention in the Cultures category, Gomez says: ‘A diminutive, graceful figure appears from the jungle, a faint accent of colour in a vanishing world.’ She continues: ‘For thousands of years Baka pygmies have lived in harmony with magnificent jungles in southeast Cameroon, but within a generation, much of their unique lifestyle will be gone forever due to deforestation and industrial interests'

This beautiful photograph by Katy Gomez depicts a child of the Baka community in a jungle in southeast Cameroon. Describing this shot, which receives a special mention in the Cultures category, Gomez says: ‘A diminutive, graceful figure appears from the jungle, a faint accent of colour in a vanishing world.’ She continues: ‘For thousands of years Baka pygmies have lived in harmony with magnificent jungles in southeast Cameroon, but within a generation, much of their unique lifestyle will be gone forever due to deforestation and industrial interests’

This majestic photograph of Japan’s Sogi Falls was captured on a day when temperatures dipped below freezing point, Singaporean photographer Weizhong Deng reveals. He says: ‘I was initially disappointed to see the entire [waterfall] covered with a thick mist upon arriving before dawn… fortunately, when the sun rose, it lit up the falls beautifully and cleared away some of the mist.’ The picture is commended in the ‘Water’ category

This majestic photograph of Japan’s Sogi Falls was captured on a day when temperatures dipped below freezing point, Singaporean photographer Weizhong Deng reveals. He says: ‘I was initially disappointed to see the entire [waterfall] covered with a thick mist upon arriving before dawn… fortunately, when the sun rose, it lit up the falls beautifully and cleared away some of the mist.’ The picture is commended in the ‘Water’ category

This powerful shot by Polish photographer Artur Stankiewicz received a special mention in the 'Art of Monochrome' category. It shows wildebeest crossing the Mara river in northern Serengeti in Tanzania in truly dramatic style, kicking up a massive dust cloud as they rush into the water

This powerful shot by Polish photographer Artur Stankiewicz received a special mention in the ‘Art of Monochrome’ category. It shows wildebeest crossing the Mara river in northern Serengeti in Tanzania in truly dramatic style, kicking up a massive dust cloud as they rush into the water 

A chimpanzee on Cameroon’s Pongo-Songo island is the subject of this hypnotising photograph by Spanish photographer Quim Fabregas Elias. He says: ‘Chimpanzees in Cameroon are under constant threat from poaching for bush meat, by deforestation and by the trafficking of the babies. Pongo-Songo island is a sanctuary on the Sanaga river, managed by [conservation group] Papaye International, France, where rescued injured and orphaned chimpanzees are able to roam freely and safely in their natural habitat.’ The picture received a special mention in the ‘Art of Monochrome’ category

This arresting picture by Chinese photographer Cui Zhoufan shows a horse in the Chinese province of Heilongjiang that has become panicked by a 'fierce gale' ripping through the landscape. Impressed, the judges have awarded the picture a special mention in the ‘Art of Monochrome’ category

LEFT: A chimpanzee on Cameroon’s Pongo-Songo island is the subject of this hypnotising photograph by Spanish photographer Quim Fabregas Elias. He says: ‘Chimpanzees in Cameroon are under constant threat from poaching for bush meat, by deforestation and by the trafficking of the babies. Pongo-Songo island is a sanctuary on the Sanaga river, managed by [conservation group] Papaye International, France, where rescued injured and orphaned chimpanzees are able to roam freely and safely in their natural habitat.’ The picture received a special mention in the ‘Art of Monochrome’ category. RIGHT: This arresting picture by Chinese photographer Cui Zhoufan shows a horse in the Chinese province of Heilongjiang that has become panicked by a ‘fierce gale’ ripping through the landscape. Impressed, the judges have awarded the picture a special mention in the ‘Art of Monochrome’ category

Bagging a special mention in the ‘Art of Monochrome’ category, this picture shows a distinctive water feature at Dubai's Expo 2020 event, an exhibition that featured immersive displays. Indian photographer Shyjith Onden Cheriyath, who was behind the lens, explains: ‘From the start of Expo 2020 Dubai, this unique water feature became one of the biggest attractions. Visitors stop off to dip their feet in the waterfall that crashes to the ground before disappearing into the stone. The water also dances to music as people frolic in the tumbling stream below’

Bagging a special mention in the ‘Art of Monochrome’ category, this picture shows a distinctive water feature at Dubai’s Expo 2020 event, an exhibition that featured immersive displays. Indian photographer Shyjith Onden Cheriyath, who was behind the lens, explains: ‘From the start of Expo 2020 Dubai, this unique water feature became one of the biggest attractions. Visitors stop off to dip their feet in the waterfall that crashes to the ground before disappearing into the stone. The water also dances to music as people frolic in the tumbling stream below’

Taken by U.S photographer Dana Allen, this shot - a ‘beetle’s eye view’ - homes in on the legs of an African elephant among a herd in Zimbabwe’s Hwange National Park. The picture is part of a portfolio of work that has been named a runner-up in the ‘Art of Monochrome’ category

Taken by U.S photographer Dana Allen, this shot – a ‘beetle’s eye view’ – homes in on the legs of an African elephant among a herd in Zimbabwe’s Hwange National Park. The picture is part of a portfolio of work that has been named a runner-up in the ‘Art of Monochrome’ category

Israeli photographer Roie Galitz was behind the camera for this emotive shot of two polar bears embracing. Titled ‘White Wedding’, it was captured on the Van Mijenfjorden fjord in Norway's Svalbard archipelago. Galitz says: ‘During this honeymoon, a blizzard and a whiteout made it very difficult for humans, but the polar bear couple didn’t seem to care.’ The picture is part of a series that snapped up the top prize in the ‘Art of Monochrome’ category

Israeli photographer Roie Galitz was behind the camera for this emotive shot of two polar bears embracing. Titled ‘White Wedding’, it was captured on the Van Mijenfjorden fjord in Norway’s Svalbard archipelago. Galitz says: ‘During this honeymoon, a blizzard and a whiteout made it very difficult for humans, but the polar bear couple didn’t seem to care.’ The picture is part of a series that snapped up the top prize in the ‘Art of Monochrome’ category

This striking shot of a heron with its lunch, snared on Kenya’s Masai Mara National Reserve, has made Rohan Shah a runner-up for the ‘Young Travel Photographer of the Year 14 and Under’ award. Shah, 14, explains: ‘The grey heron managed to get hold of a very slimy skink [a type of lizard], by piercing the creature’s head. The heron flew away, showing off its large wingspan’

This striking shot of a heron with its lunch, snared on Kenya’s Masai Mara National Reserve, has made Rohan Shah a runner-up for the ‘Young Travel Photographer of the Year 14 and Under’ award. Shah, 14, explains: ‘The grey heron managed to get hold of a very slimy skink [a type of lizard], by piercing the creature’s head. The heron flew away, showing off its large wingspan’

This atmospheric photograph helped 18-year-old British photographer Cal Cole earn a runner-up accolade for the ‘Young Travel Photographer of the Year 15 to 18 Years’ award. ‘I feel the contrast between nature and urban is very interesting,’ Cole says of the image, taken on a foggy evening in Prestwich, Greater Manchester, in woodland that lies next to a busy junction

This atmospheric photograph helped 18-year-old British photographer Cal Cole earn a runner-up accolade for the ‘Young Travel Photographer of the Year 15 to 18 Years’ award. ‘I feel the contrast between nature and urban is very interesting,’ Cole says of the image, taken on a foggy evening in Prestwich, Greater Manchester, in woodland that lies next to a busy junction 

Behold one of the pictures that won Matjaz Krivic the title of Travel Photographer of the Year 2022. Captured in the Ol Pejeta Conservancy in Nanyuki, Kenya, the poignant shot shows Najin, one of the last two northern white rhinos left in the world, resting in the heat of the afternoon with her caretaker Zachary Mutai. Krivic explains: ‘The northern white rhino is all but extinct. The two last males died several years ago. The two females are still with us, but [they’re] too feeble to bear babies.’ The photographer explains that the rhinos' eggs are now being artificially fertilised by sperm from the late male northern white rhinos. This is done ‘in hopes that surrogate rhinos from another subspecies can carry the northern white back from the brink’

Behold one of the pictures that won Matjaz Krivic the title of Travel Photographer of the Year 2022. Captured in the Ol Pejeta Conservancy in Nanyuki, Kenya, the poignant shot shows Najin, one of the last two northern white rhinos left in the world, resting in the heat of the afternoon with her caretaker Zachary Mutai. Krivic explains: ‘The northern white rhino is all but extinct. The two last males died several years ago. The two females are still with us, but [they’re] too feeble to bear babies.’ The photographer explains that the rhinos’ eggs are now being artificially fertilised by sperm from the late male northern white rhinos. This is done ‘in hopes that surrogate rhinos from another subspecies can carry the northern white back from the brink’

This, another image from Krivic’s impressive body of work, shows a ‘ravaged mountainside with a single tree withstanding the lava flow’ during the eruption of the Cumbre Vieja volcano on the Spanish island of La Palma. The eruption, which continued for 85 days in late 2021, was the island’s longest-running volcano eruption ever. The photographer says: ‘Huge rivers of lava and enormous amounts of continuously falling volcanic ash have transformed this Spanish holiday paradise’

This, another image from Krivic’s impressive body of work, shows a ‘ravaged mountainside with a single tree withstanding the lava flow’ during the eruption of the Cumbre Vieja volcano on the Spanish island of La Palma. The eruption, which continued for 85 days in late 2021, was the island’s longest-running volcano eruption ever. The photographer says: ‘Huge rivers of lava and enormous amounts of continuously falling volcanic ash have transformed this Spanish holiday paradise’

|0|https://www.dailymail.co.uk/travel/article-11692773/The-astonishing-winning-shots-2022-Travel-Photographer-Year-awards.html?ns_mchannel=rss&ns_campaign=1490&ito=1490|1||2|www.dailymail.co.uk|E|

Baked disaster! Social media users share the most hilarious cake fails

That takes the cake! Hilarious baking disasters will make you feel better about your own failed culinary efforts

Nothing says how much you care quite like a celebratory cake that has been hours in the making with a sentimental message on top.

But social media users from around the world have shared when well-intentioned cakes haven’t turned out as intended, and Bored Panda has compiled them into an amusing collection.

One off-putting green offering came complete with a layer of pickles for decoration, while another was the opposite of an edible Disney fairytale, featuring an angry-looking Elsa and Anna on top of a Frozen-themed baked disaster.

Here, FEMAIL shares the funniest cake fails that are the definition of ‘it’s the thought that counts’…

Absolutely quackers! One cake manifested a petrifying depiction of a duck with deranged eyes

Absolutely quackers! One cake manifested a petrifying depiction of a duck with deranged eyes

Try again! One baker left a classic spelling error emblazoned on top of their creation for all to see

Try again! One baker left a classic spelling error emblazoned on top of their creation for all to see

Are you afraid? A Twilight fan decorated their cake with Edward Cullen's petrifying quote and an even more petrifying image of his face

Are you afraid? A Twilight fan decorated their cake with Edward Cullen’s petrifying quote and an even more petrifying image of his face

Eyes on the side of your head! One baker from the US failed their attempt at making a horse in cake form, leaving it with glaring eyes and bared teeth

Eyes on the side of your head! One baker from the US failed their attempt at making a horse in cake form, leaving it with glaring eyes and bared teeth

In a pickle! The opposite of a sweet treat, one unappetising green cake was decorated with pickles

In a pickle! The opposite of a sweet treat, one unappetising green cake was decorated with pickles

Magical mess! A unicorn cake was left as a mystical explosion of colour by one excited baker

Magical mess! A unicorn cake was left as a mystical explosion of colour by one excited baker

Gruesome! One cake. one sale in the US, depicted an unidentifiable creature with a red nose and exposed gnashers

Gruesome! One cake. one sale in the US, depicted an unidentifiable creature with a red nose and exposed gnashers

Let it be gone! A frightening portrayal of Disney favourite Frozen was crafted on top of one cake, featuring an angry Elsa and Anna

Let it be gone! A frightening portrayal of Disney favourite Frozen was crafted on top of one cake, featuring an angry Elsa and Anna

Sleeping on the job! One baker imitated the signature cake fail of Sleeping Beauty, complete with escaping candles

Sleeping on the job! One baker imitated the signature cake fail of Sleeping Beauty, complete with escaping candles

Drake cake! A less-than-life-like recreation of a Drake album cover was iced on the top of one baked creation

Drake cake! A less-than-life-like recreation of a Drake album cover was iced on the top of one baked creation

Strawberry flop-cake! Another cake depicted a scary pink creature with a gaping mouth and large teeth

Strawberry flop-cake! Another cake depicted a scary pink creature with a gaping mouth and large teeth

Special cake for a special day! One simple white wedding cake went wrong, leaving an exposed middle layer

Special cake for a special day! One simple white wedding cake went wrong, leaving an exposed middle layer 

Drive away! Another sloppy creation left the shape of a car almost unidentifiable among the colourful mess

Drive away! Another sloppy creation left the shape of a car almost unidentifiable among the colourful mess

|0|https://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-11693019/Baked-disaster-Social-media-users-share-hilarious-cake-fails.html?ns_mchannel=rss&ns_campaign=1490&ito=1490|1||2|www.dailymail.co.uk|E|

Exclusive for Mail on Sunday readers: Tour the gardens of the Cotswolds with Rachel de Thame

Exclusive for Mail on Sunday readers: Tour the gardens of the Cotswolds with Rachel de Thame

The Cotswolds is one of the UK’s most scenic regions, with chocolate-box villages dotted amid rolling green hills and plenty of quaint country pubs to explore.

This idyllic region is also blessed with beautiful gardens, from the pristine grounds of historic stately homes to kitchen gardens tucked away behind charming cottages.

Join us on a five-day tour of some of the Cotswolds’ loveliest gardens and you’ll see many of the best examples in the area and learn about the wonderful variety of plants and flowers to be found here.

A highlight of the trip is a visit to Bourton House, in the company of Gardeners’ World presenter Rachel de Thame. Rachel will join you on a guided tour of the delightful grounds, with their elegant terraces, wide herbaceous borders, creatively planted pots and rare trees. You’ll also enjoy a welcome drink with Rachel, where she will give a talk and share her gardening insights.

Colourful: On The Mail on Sunday's five-day tour of the Cotswolds, you'll visit the stunning gardens of Bourton House (pictured)

Colourful: On The Mail on Sunday’s five-day tour of the Cotswolds, you’ll visit the stunning gardens of Bourton House (pictured)

Other plots to explore on this fascinating trip include the follies and trails of Painswick Rococo Garden, and the Batsford Arboretum’s collection of 1,300 different trees and shrubs. There’s also a visit to see the family-run Kiftsgate Court Gardens as well as Eastleach House Gardens, where you can marvel at its luxuriant yew hedges.

You’ll stay at the Hilton Puckrup Hall Hotel in Tewkesbury throughout your trip, where you’ll enjoy breakfast and dinner each day. 

The hotel is set in 140 acres of lovely private grounds – perfect for relaxing in the true rural tranquillity of the Cotswolds between garden visits.

You'll have the chance to admire the lush greenery at the family-run Kiftsgate Court Gardens

You’ll have the chance to admire the lush greenery at the family-run Kiftsgate Court Gardens

MEET OUR SPECIAL GUEST

You will be joined by Rachel de Thame

You will be joined by Rachel de Thame

A broadcaster, horticulturist, garden designer and writer, Rachel de Thame’s love of gardens began when she was a child. A familiar face on TV screens since 1999, Rachel is best known for hosting Gardeners’ World, ITV series Countrywise and covering the Chelsea Flower Show.

REASONS TO BOOK

Exclusive events with Rachel de Thame: Gardeners’ World and Countrywise presenter Rachel de Thame will join you for a guided tour of Bourton House Gardens and a delicious afternoon tea at the property. She’ll also give an insightful talk at your hotel over drinks.

Painswick Rococo Garden: Spend a morning discovering the delights of Painswick Rococo Garden, full of quirky features, ornamental decor and pastel colours throughout.

Relax in the peaceful grounds of your hotel: Spend four nights at the four-star Hilton Puckrup Hall Hotel in tranquil Tewkesbury. The hotel is set in 140 acres of parkland and features a championship golf course, indoor pool, fitness centre and spa.

Bourton House Gardens: You’ll enjoy a guided tour of these elegant grounds with Rachel de Thame. Here you can enjoy the topiary walk; White Garden, where ivory roses line the walkways; water features and incredible views of the surrounding countryside from a raised 18th Century walkway.

Expert tour manager: You’ll be joined throughout your tour by David Hurrion. David has more than 50 years’ gardening experience and will have plenty of informed and entertaining insights to share as you explore the Cotswolds’ best gardens.

Delicious food included: Breakfast and dinner at your hotel’s restaurant each day is included. The menu is inspired by the best local produce, and flavours from around the world. You will also enjoy lunch at Miserden – a family-run, estate overlooking the Cotswolds’ beautiful Golden Valley.

WHAT’S INCLUDED 

  • Four nights’ bed and breakfast at the Hilton Puckrup Hall Hotel
  • Visit to Bourton House Gardens in the company of Rachel de Thame
  • Talk and Q&A by Rachel de Thame
  • Services of expert tour manager David Hurrion
  • Four dinners at the hotel
  • Afternoon tea at Bourton House and lunch at Miserden
  • Full programme of visits and guided tours as detailed in itinerary
  • Coach transfers throughout the trip

YOUR ITINERARY: DAY 1 Arrive in Tewkesbury DAY 2 Hidcote Gardens and Kiftsgate DAY 3 Batsford Arboretum and Bourton House DAY 4 Eastleach House Gardens and Rodmarton Manor DAY 5 Painswick Rococo Garden and Miserden

HOW TO BOOK

The price: From £1,375pp* The date: June 7, 2023

CALL 020 4586 2877 quoting MOS RACHEL DE THAM. To find out more, visit mailtravel.co.uk/racheldethame

Terms and conditions:*From price is per person, based on two people sharing a room, subject to availability. Price and itinerary correct at time of print but may be subject to change. Single supplement £343. Deposit £75pp. Local charges such as tourist tax may apply. In the case of unforeseen circumstances, expert(s) may be substituted, and any expert-led events may be subject to change. Expert(s) will not join you for your full trip duration unless otherwise stated. Travel insurance is not included but required for most of our overseas trips and should be taken out at time of booking. Images used may not reflect your actual tour experience. This holiday may be sold through other selected brands. Tour is operated by and subject to the booking conditions of Travel Editions Group Ltd, ABTA V3120 and TS Travel Limited (ATOL bonded).

|0|https://www.dailymail.co.uk/travel/escape/article-11686559/Exclusive-Mail-Sunday-readers-Tour-gardens-Cotswolds-Rachel-Thame.html?ns_mchannel=rss&ns_campaign=1490&ito=1490|1||2|www.dailymail.co.uk|E|

Hilarious photos capture the look of joy on these dogs faces as they are thrown a treat 

Who’s a good boy!? Hilarious photos capture the look of joy on these dogs faces as they are thrown a treat

  •  The hilarious hound images are a great source of entertainment for dog lovers 
  •  Christian Vieler snapped this series of comical action shots of adorable pooches catching their treats mid-air

Advertisement


|0|https://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-11691755/Hilarious-photos-capture-look-joy-dogs-faces-thrown-treat.html?ns_mchannel=rss&ns_campaign=1490&ito=1490|1||2|www.dailymail.co.uk|E|

China’s $6 trillion consumer market is digging itself out of a slump

BEIJING — China’s consumption recovery from zero-Covid is getting off to a solid start – after a depressing fourth quarter.

When Michelin-starred restaurant Rêver reopened Thursday from a Lunar New Year break, it was fully booked, said Edward Suen, chief operating officer of the Guangzhou venue. Reservations for the next three days were near capacity, he said.

He’s hopeful business improves this year – and allows Rêver to recoup the roughly 35% in revenue it lost last year. Guangzhou city was one of the hardest hit by China’s Covid controls in late 2022, before Beijing abruptly ended most measures in early December and a wave of infections hit the country.

“Last Christmas, it was the first time in three years we didn’t run a full house, because quite a lot of people made reservations but then they got infected,” Suen said. He co-founded Rêver in June 2020.

In a down-to-earth Chinese city known worldwide for its Cantonese cuisine, Rêver is exploring a new market by serving modern French cuisine, with a multi-course dinner priced at 1,280 yuan ($183) or 1,680 yuan.

For the year ahead, “we try to be a little bit conservative on how things go,” Suen said. “Because everything’s changed so fast and so sudden in these days.”

A big challenge for China is rallying private sector confidence, professor says

In 2022, China saw one of its slowest years of economic growth in decades. Within a retail sales slump of 0.2% to 43.97 trillion yuan ($6.28 trillion), catering sales dropped by a steeper 6.3%.

More recent data show Chinese consumers are starting to open their wallets again, especially for travel.

During the seven-day Lunar New Year holiday that ended Friday, national tourism revenue surged by 30% from last year to 375.84 billion yuan, according to official figures. But that was still short of 2019 spending.

“Consumer sentiment is better. Spending power is kind of back,” Ashley Dudarenok, founder of China digital consultancy ChoZan, said Friday. “But I don’t think that suddenly from one month to the next things are back … to 2019 or double 2019.”

Dudarenok said that heading into 2023 and the Lunar New Year, some smaller brands had turned more conservative on China and cut their marketing budgets for the country in half.

“Consumer sentiment was really down, nobody knew what was actually coming, and a lot of marketing budget and dollars went into 11.11 [Singles Day] and it was also not successful, so brands did not earn a lot over 11.11” and another shopping festival in December, she said. “Then suddenly China opened. Many people did not expect that [and were] quite startled by this swift development.”

Dudarenok does expect overall consumer trends to continue, whether it’s people in larger cities spending more “on feeling better” or people in smaller cities paying for higher-quality products.

Read more about China from CNBC Pro

Many analysts expect high levels of savings among Chinese consumers during the pandemic will translate to greater spending this year.

At the policymaker level, Chinese authorities say they’re prioritizing consumption. Premier Li Keqiang led the first post-holiday executive meeting of the State Council on Saturday, and “called for efforts to expedite consumption recovery and keep foreign trade and investment stable,” according to a readout. The meeting said policies to promote the consumption of cars and other big-ticket items would be “fully implemented.”

However, unlike the U.S., China has not distributed cash to consumers nationwide in the wake of the pandemic. Li told reporters in 2022 that policymakers would instead focus on supporting businesses and jobs.

“We believe that the most important factor influencing the consumption is the outlook on future income which ties to many factors,” Hao Zhou, chief economist at Guotai Junan International, said in a note. “That being said, the reduced policy and virus uncertainties will definitely help improve the sentiment.”

He expects 7% year-on-year growth in retail sales.

Hainan’s recovery plans

Hainan, a tropical province aiming to be a duty free shopping destination, announced a goal for 10% growth in retail sales this year. That’s after its retail sales fell by 9.2% last year.

The island’s 12 duty-free stores saw gross sales of 2.57 billion yuan during the Lunar New Year holiday week, according to the local commerce department.

Those holiday sales were more than four times what they were in 2019, the release said, reflecting the region’s growth and new mall openings over the last few years.

LVMH and Coach-parent Tapestry both signed deals in 2022 with local authorities to expand their business in Hainan, including the establishment of Tapestry’s China travel retail headquarters, according to government announcements. The two companies did not immediately respond to a CNBC request for comment.

Top executives from U.S. and European brands, among others, plan to visit Hainan this year now that Covid restrictions are relaxed, said Ruslan Tulenov, global media officer for Hainan’s Bureau of International Economic Development. He declined to say how many or when.

“Before I personally I had some few discussions with some top companies last year or two years ago, but at that time [there were] some Covid restrictions, difficulties coming to China,” he said. “Some companies, they even would like to take their private jets to fly to Hainan directly, but at that time there were some Covid restrictions.”

New trends, changing fast

Brands in China have to adjust to changes not only in the Covid situation but also in the market.

Companies are moving more marketing dollars to ByteDance’s Douyin, the local version of TikTok, and away from Weibo, Dudarenok said.

While those brands were on Douyin for years, they were not part of the social conversation on the highly popular app, she said. For brands, she said the thinking now is that “China has changed, most important China has opened, and to get into that business we need to be part of that conversation.”

|0|https://www.cnbc.com/2023/01/30/chinas-6-trillion-consumer-market-is-digging-itself-out-of-a-slump.html|1|https://image.cnbcfm.com/api/v1/image/107185617-1675052902772-gettyimages-1246589406-308_Million_Domestic_Tourists_During_The_Spring_Festival_Holiday.jpeg?v=1675057973&w=1920&h=1080|2|www.cnbc.com|E|